The Bread Basket

Drowning In A Ditch

When the English explorer Sir Francis Drake returned from his fifth voyage around the world, he was caught in a small but intense storm on the Thames River. As his vessel was tossed about and appeared ready to capsize, the old mariner clenched his fists and exclaimed hotly, “Can it be that I who have …

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Humility

Twentieth-century theologian C. S. Lewis once observed, “Humility isn’t thinking less of YOURSELF, but thinking of yourself LESS!” Let that sink in for a while. Each of us, as a child of God, deserves the very best, but…we need to be reminded that life isn’t all about us! And for that reason, Paul, in writing to the young Christians …

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Driving Too Fast

When automobiles were first introduced to the marketplace in the early part of the twentieth century, like everything else that was new, these “horseless carriages” raised a few Brethren eyebrows—particularly among the church leadership. Automobiles were looked upon as being worldly, but eventually they gained acceptance, even among church leaders. Bitzer Johns was a straight …

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The Abandoned Bird Nest

J.H. Moore (1846-1935) served as Editor of the Church of the Brethren’s Gospel Messenger from 1883-1884 and again from 1891-1915. The Brethren Encyclopedia says of Brother Moore’s formative years: “As he grew older his determination to learn sparked a tremendous interest in books, and he read widely on many subjects” (Page 874). During his long and productive life, J.H. Moore accumulated …

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When God Tinkers

The famous American automobile manufacturer, Henry Ford, one day hired an electrical genius, Charlie Steinmetz, to do some repair work at the plant on one of the huge electrical motors. Mr. Steinmetz looked things over, found the problem without much effort and fixed it—and then sent Mr. Ford a bill for $10,000.00! Upon receipt of …

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Discernment

‘The ability to perceive, recognize, and distinguish” is how Webster defines discernment. He says further that discernment is “the quality of being able to grasp and comprehend what is obscure.” For many years, Swiss watchmakers dominated the market. Their reputation for building the best watches money could buy was unparalleled. By the 1940s, the Swiss produced 80% of all …

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The Violinist

On January 12, 2007, a young man playing a violin stood at the L’Enfant Plaza subway station in Washington, D.C. In the forty-five minutes he performed that cold winter morning, more than a thousand people passed by After about three minutes, a middle-aged man noticed that the musician was playing, slowed his pace, stopped for a few …

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